Years ago, before Millennials stalked the earth, I received a call from the Israeli tax authorities. ‘When is your client going to approach us regarding the capital gains tax on their transaction?’ I was duly impressed by the fact the inspector had read that morning’s paper and put two and two together, and was tempted to reply, ‘When they approach me’, but I opted for the benign, ‘All in good time’.

Once more unto the breach, my friends, once more

The fact was that, in the good old days, when the tax authorities wanted money, they had to get off their bottoms and sniff it out. I believe the thrill was in the chase. Not anymore.

Our friends at the Treasury now bless us with their annual shopping list of ‘Positions Requiring Reporting’. These are common tax planning devices where the taxpayer is told, ‘Do what you want, but you have to tell us about it if you are going to make a packet from it’. If all things go to plan, the sniffer dogs will be round before you can say, ‘Two tickets to South America, please’.

Thou hast slept well. Awake

The latest list, published last week, leans heavily on those coming out of the 10 year tax exempt hibernation granted to first time residents and veteran returning residents on their foreign income. As that particular jolly only entered the law in 2007, it is not surprising that the boys and girls gathering fuel for the engines of state have only woken up now –a year after the  first beneficiaries of the status  were required to report (the 2017 tax year, reporting in 2018).

What is irksome is that, apart from some of the positions being churlish (the income of CFCs and Foreign Personal Vocation Companies being taxable for the entire year even if the new resident’s 10 year period only expired on December 30th), there is at least one which is downright weird. The best way to understand it is to assume the authors of the list were having such a festive time in December while sitting in the comfort of their offices, pens at the ready, that they let the party get out of hand. I will explain.

Among the new positions, it is clarified that, if a dividend is paid from a foreign company after the end of the 10 year exemption period, but in that same year, despite the fact that the income of the foreign company accrued during the 10 year period, it is taxed normally. Fair dinkum. Dividends are a distinct ‘source of income’ in the tax ordinance, and the dividend appeared after the 10 year period. Although not presented in order, it is likely this led them on to the CFCs and Foreign Personal Vocation Companies where a ‘notional’ dividend is considered received on the last day of the year. Not nice that they didn’t split the year into ‘before’ and ‘after’ – it wouldn’t have hurt if, heaven forbid, they had taken the intention of the legislature into account – but there is little to do but gnash teeth.

Aye, there’s the rub

Then the authorities went a step further. Trusts settled by living parents (and certain others) for their Israeli resident children – known as Relatives Trusts – are, by default, required to pay  tax when a distribution is made. Provision is made in the law, and tax authority circulars, for the capital element to be deducted and losses and foreign tax credits to be taken into account, subject to proof being provided to the assessing officer. This approach is distinct from regular trusts that pay tax on an accumulative annual basis – a status that can also be elected by a relatives trust that chooses not to pursue the distribution route (also obtaining a beneficial tax rate). Beneficiaries in their 10 year exemption period are unequivocably entitled to an exemption from tax. But, what about those on the distribution route who receive distributions of income earned after the exemption period?

Fair is foul, and foul is fair

Evidently pushing the dividend analogy one stage too far, they came to the conclusion that, as the tax event only occurs on distribution, no exemption will apply if the distribution is made after the 10 years. However, while dividends are a ‘source of income’ liable to be taxed in their own right, a distribution is not . What is more, the wording of the law clearly relates to the income derived or accrued abroad – not a million miles from the wording of the clause dealing with the 10 year exemption. It is hard to understand why the exemption would not apply.

I am not bound to please thee with my answers

The good news is that these positions are not legally binding – although their reporting will invite the prospect of audit.

But, let’s face it – the language of our laws isn’t up to Shakespeare’s standards.

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